Signs You're Not Getting Enough Protein

How Much Do You Need?

You should get a minimum of 10% of your daily calories from protein. (For a target of grams, multiply your weight in pounds by 0.36.) And you want it from a variety of sources throughout the day: A tub of low-fat Greek yogurt for breakfast has about 20 grams; a serving of skinless chicken breast at lunch, about 25 grams; and a cup of black beans in your dinner, about 15 grams. Your body breaks down and reuses the protein in many ways.

Swelling

One of the most common signs that you're not getting enough protein is swelling (also called edema), especially in your abdomen, legs, feet, and hands. A possible explanation: The proteins that circulate in your blood -- albumin, in particular -- help keep fluid from building up in your tissues. But many things can cause edema, so be sure to check with your doctor in case it's more serious.

Mood Changes

Your brain uses chemicals called neurotransmitters to relay information between cells. Many of these neurotransmitters are made of amino acids, which are the building blocks of protein. So a lack of protein in your diet could mean your body can't make enough of those neurotransmitters, and that would change how your brain works. With low levels of dopamine and serotonin, for example, you may feel depressed or overly aggressive.

Hair, Nail, and Skin Problems

These are made up of proteins like elastin, collagen, and keratin. When your body can't make them, you could have brittle or thinning hair, dry and flaky skin, and deep ridges on your fingernails. Your diet isn't the only possible cause, of course, but it's something to consider.

Weakness and Fatigue

Research shows that just a week of not eating enough protein can affect the muscles responsible for your posture and movement, especially if you're 55 or older. And over time, a lack of protein can make you lose muscle mass, which in turn cuts your strength, makes it harder to keep your balance, and slows your metabolism. It can also lead to anemia, when your cells don't get enough oxygen, which makes you tired.

Shaneka Young